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Won't start, loses power when key to on

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by bs63366, Dec 11, 2017.

  1. Dec 11, 2017 at 3:00 PM
    #1
    bs63366

    bs63366 [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2016
    Member:
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    177
    Gender:
    Male
    San Angelo
    Vehicle:
    2014 Tacoma TRD Off Road DCSB
    ARE Z-series shell, ImMrYo mirror lift, always on fog-lights.
    Went out this morning and pulled the truck forward to load up a load of stuff to take to my storage unit and it started fine. Got back in after loading up the bed and when I turn the key to on all electrical power goes away. There was some corrosion on the positive terminal and I cleaned that the best that I could, pulled both terminals and cleaned both terminals and post. I am lost on how it can drop power this fast. Also I checked the body ground next to the battery and it was good and secured. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Truck is a 2014 Off Road.
     
  2. Dec 11, 2017 at 3:18 PM
    #2
    nd4spdbh

    nd4spdbh Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2013
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    #114055
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    SoCal
    Vehicle:
    13 DCSB TRD OR v6 Auto
    bad battery. They just up and quit sometimes. This is why i always carry a jumper pack.
     
  3. Dec 11, 2017 at 5:50 PM
    #3
    cliffyk

    cliffyk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2016
    Member:
    #200890
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    First Name:
    Cliff
    Saint Augustine, FL
    Vehicle:
    2009 DCSB SR5 TRD Sport 145k miles
    ^this...

    Modern batteries very often die in that manner--most likely a shorted cell. Get a AC conductance based battery analyzer like this one from HF and test your new battery after it has fully charged and rested for 30-45 minutes--record the readings, voltage, internal resistance, and CCA. I've had mine for nearly 5 years, still works like a champ.

    Then every 6 months or so test it again and compare the readings to the new battery values; when you see the internal resistance get up to 5.5 or so mΩ and/or the CCA drop to 75% of the "new" value it will be time to think about getting a new battery and not get stranded again.

    These were the "new" values for the EverStart battery I got in April:

    '09 Tacoma
    EverStart Maxx 24F
    -----------------------
    04.01.2017
    12.96 V
    3.51 mΩ
    841.8 CCA
    -----------------------

    These are the values from last month (all are within the expected accuracy of the tester):
    -----------------------
    11.09.2017
    12.92 V
    3.52 mΩ
    840.9 CCA
    -----------------------

    Walmart has one online for $25.08 with free shipping--haven't seen it personally, however its display looks identical to the HF unit and if you "google" it there are some decent reviews...
     
  4. Dec 11, 2017 at 7:37 PM
    #4
    bs63366

    bs63366 [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2016
    Member:
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    Messages:
    177
    Gender:
    Male
    San Angelo
    Vehicle:
    2014 Tacoma TRD Off Road DCSB
    ARE Z-series shell, ImMrYo mirror lift, always on fog-lights.
    Thanks for the suggestions. Had a buddy run me up to the autoparts store and tested the battery and came back with a whooping 18 CCA. Needless to say a new battery and I am back on the road. I have never had a battery just up and quit like that but live and learn. Thanks for the help.
     
  5. Dec 11, 2017 at 7:41 PM
    #5
    12TRDTacoma

    12TRDTacoma Powered by Ford, GM, VW, and Mercedes

    Joined:
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    Rob
    Concordia
    Vehicle:
    12 TRD Sport DCLB 4x4 Supercharged
    Boosted
    Me personally speaking I like the old school carbon pile load testers. They are much more accurate and things like surface charges never get in the way of it failing a battery if it is truly bad.
     
  6. Dec 11, 2017 at 9:24 PM
    #6
    cliffyk

    cliffyk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    #200890
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    First Name:
    Cliff
    Saint Augustine, FL
    Vehicle:
    2009 DCSB SR5 TRD Sport 145k miles
    I used to be 'til I got the conductance tester, and got comfortable with understanding what it was telling me.

    Now my 500 A carbon pile tester sits on a shelf, and there's two or three nichrome heater coil units of 200/100 A capacity living somewhere in the barn. The CP tester is great for testing generator output (however I've not had to do that for a while); the "toaster" units are pretty much useless.

    A good conductance based analyzer will see right through a surface charge or electrolyte stratification...
     
  7. Dec 11, 2017 at 9:44 PM
    #7
    cliffyk

    cliffyk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2016
    Member:
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    Messages:
    2,039
    First Name:
    Cliff
    Saint Augustine, FL
    Vehicle:
    2009 DCSB SR5 TRD Sport 145k miles
    First time it hit me was with my '03 Mustang and the 3-year-old OEM battery. I had made several shopping stops on a Saturday morning with no problems, then came out of Ace Hardware and just as you described turn the key on and nothing. SA was a smaller town 10 years ago and the store owner gave me a ride to Advance Auto and back.

    From some research I found that newer starting duty batteries are designed with thinner plates to maintain higher voltages (>10.5 V) while cranking--and thereby keep the electronics happy. The downside is that the thinner plates are more prone to shorting, and can fail quite unexpectedly as you and I have found.

    Conductance analysis will catch this potential failure before you need to "thumb" a ride...
     

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