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1st Gen A/C System Replacement How-To (Seized Compressor)

Discussion in '1st Gen. Tacomas (1995-2004)' started by geodude, Aug 31, 2013.

  1. Aug 31, 2013 at 10:44 PM
    #1
    geodude

    geodude [OP] Well-Known Member

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    This post serves as both an explanatory and educational guide for 1st Generation (1995.5-2004) Toyota Tacoma owners looking for help with their A/C system. I am not/nor claim to be a professional, and so any damage caused to you or your vehicle as a result of this information is on you. This repair was done on a 2002 Toyota Tacoma 2.7L Reg. Cab Truck

    A few weeks ago the A/C compressor in my truck seized during operation. The outermost plate of the compressor (clutch plate) was completely locked, so turning on the A/C or defroster (defroster hot or cold uses compressor for dryer air) would cause the truck to noticeably bog (trying to spin something that wont spin), a burning smell coming through the vents, and if you let it run, probably a snapped a/c belt.

    Sometimes, you can get "lucky" and this might just be the clutch, or bearing in the compressor that's seized and it'll be a much more labor and cost intensive job. However in retrospect; a few weeks prior I had noticed a small green streak of oil below the compressor, and the performance of my A/C had been lacking. There was no pressure in my A/C system and after the compressor seized and I inspected around it a little more I noticed a lot more compressor oil sprayed all over. My a/c system had leaked out all the oil causing the compressor to detonate.

    Because this happened during operation this means that the little metal bits and pieces from the detonation were now cycled all throughout my a/c components. This shrapnel, if not completely removed/flushed from the system would most certainly continue to cause problems within the system indefinitely.

    I decided it would be a worth while investment to replace all the components of my A/C system, as modern condensers and evaporators cannot be flushed 100% effectively.

    This is not a very difficult job, but it will take a considerable amount of time and patience. Keep in mind, you're saving at least a net $1000 vs having this done a shop; so it's worth it.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------
    PARTS/FLUIDS LIST:
    (All from partsgeek or autozone or I already had)

    A/C Receiver/Dryer (Denso) $21.25 -Necessary replacement Denso is OEM
    A/C Compressor (Denso) $204.25 - Necessary replacement Denso is OEM
    A/C Expansion Valve (UAC) $9.75 - Debris will be caught in here from the implosion of the compressor
    A/C Evaporator (UAC) $34.25 - Some say it can be flushed of debris, some say not. For $35, what the hell.
    A/C O-Ring kit (Santech) $10.25 - All o-rings need to be replaced
    A/C Condenser (Action Crash) $64.48 - Lowest point in the system, will definitely have shrapnel in here and cannot be 100% flushed.
    A/C Pressure Switch (Santech) $16.29 - Mine had oil all over it (see later pic) so it was replaced
    PAG46 A/C Oil 8oz w/ UV Dye (A/C Pro) $9.99 - Best to get oil with the dye in it for finding leaks later on
    2 12 oz. Cans R134a - Straight-up R134a, I would avoid cans with leak stop additives and/or oil already in them
    Acetone or some other solvent - Opinions on what to use as a flushing solvent vary sharply. You could buy a/c flushing solvent but autozone didn't have it and I wasn't going to make two trips. I only needed it to flush the lines so I wasn't too concerned.

    TOTAL PARTS/FLUIDS COST: $370.51 + some shipping = <$400.00

    TOOL LIST:

    Fortunately I already had all the necessary tools for the job.
    The two items you will most likely need to buy if haven't done this before will be the manifold guage set and vacuum pump - both of which can be bought at harbor freight or ebay (they are sold together) for less than $130. They will pay for themselves even if you only use them this once.
    Screw drivers
    Allen wrench set
    Metric socket set (extensions help)
    Crescent Wrenches
    Extra-Small measuring cup- i used an ink cartridge syringe
    R134a Can-Tap - Small brass fitting that connects gauges to can
    Safety Glasses

    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    Keep in mind you could really disassemble the system in any order you might like, I chose to go from the front of the truck to the back.

    STEP 1:

    The first step before messing with anything on the a/c system is to take the truck to a shop and have the system professionally drained with a refrigerant recovery machine. As a disclaimer, it is ILLEGAL to vent R134a, or any refrigerant, into the atmosphere as they are known CFC's (eat ozone). Now if you had a leak in the system, or something blew up and your system evacuated itself unbeknownst to you, then you can skip that step.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------

    STEP 2:

    Pop the hood and remove the front grille:
    IMG_20130822_113502_zps79fb7ab0_41f35feaf52cacea97c2b0ea389bf4ef8a737975.jpg
    Remove the 2 screws in Yellow with a screwdriver, and then where all those red dots are there are 8 or 9 plastic tabs that need to be popped out with a small screwdriver as well (be careful not to loose these)

    While you're at it, also go ahead and remove your Skid Plate Set (7 12mm bolts) underneath the truck.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    STEP 3 (Receiver/Dryer Removal):

    Locate the receiver/dryer (next to the driver-side headlight):
    IMG_20130822_115616_zpsc185aa2f_ac65ec3051e75f007379144de7aae22dc40d0746.jpg
    1st remove the bolt that fastens the holder in which the dryer is sitting, then I removed the top 2 bolts securing the lines. The yellow circle is for the headlight bracket bolt which may have to come out to get the socket in there; if not taking it out, then it will when putting it back on.

    IMG_20130822_121736_zpsce2917a3_fadf411c6f717262d6622c554c82980eba3af44f.jpg
    Then use 2 crescent wrenches to remove this connection on the condenser, one to hold the outlet and one to twist the nut.

    IMG_20130822_121250_zpsc5053bfc_687549597ef7e6142e27635fc992e067e9535666.jpg
    Same deal here with the 2 crescent wrenches.

    Now the Receiver/Dryer should and lines should be off the truck
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Step 4 (Condenser Removal):

    Start by removing these two bolts on the passenger side of the condenser:
    IMG_20130822_122212_zpsd10a67d3_a50f06e01a6747fccb69c30bbd143f7417ceb81e.jpg

    Then I removed the brace in front of the condenser, starting with the bolt with the "1" next to it (which has this small plastic cover over it which can be popped out with a small screwdriver). Followed by the two circled bolts which will drop the hood latch. Then the top bolt for the brace which was behind that latch (dotted circle). And finally the bottom bolt for the brace which cannot be seen in the picture.
    IMG_20130822_122437_zps551a3665_27cb468484f9855ed590472ad4389e504a65e9ae.jpg

    Then take off the one horn:
    IMG_20130822_125004_zpsfaed5753_7e5bf5e949515a8500e71fcf4fe3ee31c66467da.jpg

    Lastly there are 4 bolts, (2 in each top corner) which need to come out. The picture shows the driver side of the condenser, there are the same 2 bolts on the other side that need to come out as well. Don't loose that little line clip that's circled in yellow.
    IMG_20130822_125750_zpsfdec0ba6_748010f596c2c50b161ed06ba405698ffe07dce4.jpg

    Pull the top of the condenser towards you (out of the truck) and then pull up and out and it will come right out.
    IMG_20130822_131437_zps46f48d45_084929de984c33da2ed3bfbefbcaf7c173dbe4e4.jpg

    Receiver/Dryer +lines and Condenser are out of the truck
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Step 5 (Compressor Removal)

    First thing I did was remove the Power Steering belt, and then the A/C belt. Here's a link to an excellent resource for those jobs (very easy)

    http://www.tacomaworld.com/forum/1s...nge-your-belts-p-s-c-alternator-2-4-2-7l.html

    I replaced all 3 of my belts with new belts while doing the job. If there's any significant amount of mileage on the belts, why not, its less than $25 for all 3 belts, and dealership would charge $150 for it.

    Now unplug the compressors electrical connection (seen in top right corner of picture) and maybe wrap it up in some electrical tape to keep moisture out. Then remove the two circle bolts securing the in and out lines with an Allen wrench.
    IMG_20130822_132920_zps962a0713_c25e61812caa70029db2418d1d33d96b36a2741f.jpg

    The one line coming from the condenser (left circle) is now able to be completely removed from the truck. To get the other line out, which goes to the firewall, you will need two crescent wrenches again and loosen the line shown in the picture. Then it can be removed as well.
    IMG_20130822_160130_zps2cf89261_9d165c6944f7177b7a55beb7fb281508c8d78380.jpg

    Then remove the 4 long bolts coming into the compressor from the passenger-side direction. I guess i only got a picture of the bottom two, but they're very easy to spot.
    IMG_20130822_161454_zpsf1d77976_04a4faa181dbbc3cd57db87b865ae66ea892751b.jpg

    With a little fines and wiggling, you will be able to pull the compressor out through the top, around the radiator hose. It's surprisingly heavy so two hands is ideal.

    Receiver/Dryer + lines, Condenser, Compressor + lines are now out of the truck.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Step 6 (Evaporator and Expansion Valve Removal):

    Probably the most difficult part of the dis-assembly.

    Start by removing the 2 small phillips screws that hold the hinges of the glove box onto the support bar.
    IMG_20130822_171151_zps996f336f_191ebdfd98421c0309fd178bf3484814ca20a1a7.jpg

    The glove box should now be out, and you'll see something like this picture below. Remove that piece of duct work by sliding it to the left, then it will pull right out. And also remove the support bar the glove box was mounted to by removing the 2 small phillips screws, and the bolt all the way out towards the passenger-side door.
    IMG_20130822_171826_zpsb901b932_b49a4262992a0955c6839aca72c3685f94fbe0c8.jpg

    After you get the duct and the bar off, unplug the two electrical connections as seen in the picture below, as well as the 3rd electrical connection blower resistor (or do as i did and unscrew the 2 small gold phillips screws and take the whole thing out)
    IMG_20130822_173500_zpsdd57c544_6e09e3133d5a84d55a4344f088837930ae4b024c.jpg

    Now were going to work on removing the entire evaporator housing by removing these 3 bottom bolts.
    IMG_20130822_173641_zps47d8e240_a3ebe0cea65c9c366add9c120373c42ec80c1030.jpg

    As well as this bolt seen in the picture below, located near that top blue/black electrical connection
    IMG_20130822_173845_zpsb318e8f2_9a52a54fbc41ae90ae996f792432c11063a5dc99.jpg

    The last bolt, as seen below circled in red, is located above the left hand side of that duct we removed. This is quite difficult to remove, and to get to it you may need to remove the top sheathing above the glove box, which comes out with three easy bolts.
    IMG_20130822_173953_zps93f13609_9d94ab244c39adcb8fc6b6ec366333f69f893491.jpg

    Now before we can entirely remove the housing, we need to go back to the engine bay, near the firewall where the two lines come into the evaporator housing, as we still have a connected line.

    As seen in the picture below, we already removed the larger line, now to remove that smaller line I just took a small screwdriver and VERY LIGHTLY pried on that black clamp and it popped off very easily (TAKE CAREFUL NOTE OF EXACTLY HOW THE CLAMP IS POSITIONED BEFORE REMOVAL). Then just gently pull the line apart.
    IMG_20130823_110937_zps9e85ff39_60f5fc43db41b6005e2d09fcb51fc5fc62fcb5c8.jpg

    Now we can go back to the cab of the truck and slowly, with minimal light wigging, careful not to bend the lines coming through the firewall, pull the entire evaporator housing out of the truck (see picture below).
    IMG_20130823_111259_zps1650c9ba_8fbe55dbf99408d83ae9d2fdd8c30abda0550472.jpg

    Once the housing is out, take it to somewhere like a workbench, or the bed of the truck and open it up. This is done by removing 3 small phillips screws and 3 small metal clips, all located along the center line of the housing. Once these screws and clips are removed the top of the housing comes right off (see below)
    IMG_20130823_111614_zps451f309a_84528e860cda7e9b66ea1f122a96e56ff5856179.jpg
    Another angle:
    IMG_20130823_111642_zps9a44f812_fa44501bce2500e171eb1218f6bb11e196aba859.jpg

    I then blew out any debris from the housing with compressed air, and wiped out all the dust and grime with a damp paper towel. You can see in the picture some of the stuff that was in there.
    IMG_20130823_111733_zpsd5dd7d58_a83dbc29040485a1f1c166324406202ddc917a31.jpg

    Then remove the two bolts holding the expansion valve onto the evaporator with an allen wrench. Remove the expansion valve from the evaporator and the lines.
    IMG_20130823_112926_zps839b7765_8c1854a507bb6598dbee906545237d780cac4470.jpg

    Now my A/C Pressure switch, seen in the picture below, had oil all over it, obviously some sort of leak here, I'm assuming from either a failed switch or a failed o-ring on the switch. I replaced the switch, which is removed easily with a crescent wrench.
    IMG_20130823_112229_zpsed7c42e0_08c98b8acef7dab7b65996009b6c3f9c9724b95a.jpg

    ALL A/C components + lines are now off of the truck. Dis-assembly is complete.

    After this point I eased up on the pictures because reassembly is just dis-assembly in reverse; in-case you weren't aware:cool: I'll kind of be breezing through this next section just noting the important things.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    REASSEMBLY

    Flush the Lines
    -
    Before I began to put anything back together, I took all of the lines individually, and from each way, poured in a little bit of Acetone (or solvent of your choice) and then blew it out with compressed air from a compressor. Make sure to swirl the air around a bit to make sure you get everything out of there. When i was sure they were flushed and dried, I plugged up each end of every line with a small piece of paper towel to make sure no debris or anything would get in there.

    Step 7 (Evaporator and Expansion Valve):

    *ADD 40cc PAG46 oil to Evaporator*
    I measured and added my oil to the components by using a syringe used for filling printer cartriges. Just measure it out and pour or squeeze it inside the component. Hold it in a way that it can work its way down through it, and won't immediately pour back out.

    1)There are 4 o-rings on the expansion valve, 2 on top where it meets the evaporator, and two on the bottom where it meets the lines. REPLACE AND PRE-OIL (YOUR PAG46) EVERY SINGLE O-RING. There is also an O-ring on the Pressure switch.

    So 5 O-rings in total for this unit. Make sure they are not pinched during reassembly as that will lead to leaks.

    2)Secure the 2 allen bolts connecting the evaporator to the evalve and lines. (Hand tight is fine, I didn't choose to follow exact Torque specs, and rarely do unless the job involves internal engine parts)

    *Note the Expansion valve is installed with the hook facing downwards and lettering out, as it was when it came out, and as the FSM show's it as well. The lettering may be upsidedown on your new unit but that's fine.

    3)Place the evaporator back into the housing, take the little black Thermistor (the wire in the front of the housing) clip from the old evaporator and slide it into the new one in a similar spot on the new evap.
    IMG_20130826_144918_zps0cac1a59_9f25b46fbda9762e8b294c3af4884fcffaff128c.jpg

    4) Put the 3 small phillips screws and 3 small clips back on to secure the top of the housing

    5) Gently slide the housing back into its place in the dash, carefully making sure the 2 lines go through the firewall first, as well as the drain in the bottom of the housing which goes through the firewall as well. Make sure all 3 rubber grommets for these components is still in place on the firewall as you slide them through.
    6) Restore all the electrical connections and Bolt 'er back up, then the support bar and duct and glove box

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Step 8 (Compressor)

    *ADD 125cc PAG46 oil to Compressor*

    Check out the shrapnel in the old compressor
    IMG_20130826_153613_zps2ef8fdc9_6dbfb71dff07227a0b3a0d38081c52dab009542d.jpg

    For the compressor there is usually a set of directions that comes with a new one; so by all means follow those first. They go something like - Drain the new compressor, add new oil, replace the top seal, take top plate off old compressor and attach to the new compressor, tighten 4 top bolts. Done.

    I flushed the top plate off my old compressor with the Acetone and air the same way I did my lines.

    New O-rings on all the lines as well

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Step 9 (Condenser):

    *ADD 40-50cc PAG46 oil to Condenser*

    My new aftermarket condenser put the lines at slightly different angles than the original, however it was noting that would cause any problems, just required a little fidgeting.

    New O-rings on all lines and fittings

    Remember to reinstall the horn, reinforcement bar in front of the condenser, and hood latch after you've got the condenser in place.

    Also there is a black plastic line clip stuck into the old condenser, dont forget to transfer it over
    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    Step 10 (Receiver/Dryer):

    *ADD 20cc PAG46 oil to Receiver/Dryer*
    -pour into the "out" side; as per instructions

    *As a tip, place the receiver in the clamp mount but only barely tighten the bolt so you can slide it up and down to make sure the lines can get the right geometry.


    [SIZE=3]Step 11 (Belts):
    [/SIZE]

    Put your A/C and Power Steering Belts back on - use the previous given link again as a guide.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    ***FINAL STEPS (CHARGING)***

    Great video on charging the system-
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lglPJuBXVeE
    1) Hang guages on the hood, secure the high and low pressure lines (small fitting = low pressure/left gauge) the gauge lines will only fit where they're supposed to go so don't worry about it.

    2) With both the high and low pressure side valves wide open, Hook the yellow (usually) feed line onto your vacuum pumps R134a adapter and screw it on tightly.

    3)Make sure your vacuum pump has the correct amount of oil in it, turn it on, and let it run for at least 30 minutes (I ran it for closer to an hour). This will evacuate all moisture from the system. The vacuum should be pulling down between -25inHg - 30inHg pending on your altitude and all that science.

    4) After the vacuum interval, its a good idea to shut off the pump, leaving the line attached however, and let the system sit for a half hour or so to make sure that you aren't gaining pressure; which would mean you have a leak in the system. I'll provide a link to a very helpful youtube video, however he suggests that you close the valves during this test period, but I think then the pressure that the gauges are reading is just the pressure within the tiny brass part of the gauge.

    5) After you have tested for leaks and it's all good, close both the valves, remove the feed line from the pump and attach it now to your can tap which you have secured to your 1st can of R134a.

    6) Start the truck, turn on the A/C with the fan speed on low

    7) Open up only the low side gauge(left gauge usually), and make sure the high side valve is closed.

    8) Screw the top of the can-tap down, piercing the refrigerant can, hold the can upsidedown and back the tap back off allowing the refrigerant to flow into the system.


    9)
    When the can is empty, close off the low-side valve, and then remove the empty can from the tap, and screw on the second 12oz can and repeat step 8.

    The FSM says the system requires 21.16oz +- 1.76, and being as 12oz is about the only size I could find 2 of those puts me at 24oz. Some is lost when you remove the gauge set and some in the can, so I figured it about works out.

    10)
    Lastly close off the low-side valve and carefully disconnect the high and low adapters from your system *the high pressure side might spray a little so wear your safety glasses

    And That's All Folks
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    All information and specs in this guide was taken from either the Factory Service Manual or this forum. Credit to
    5vzlove for his help.
     
    Sklar, Xbeaus, sramirez1516 and 6 others like this.
  2. Aug 31, 2013 at 10:51 PM
    #2
    95 taco

    95 taco Battle Born

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    Good job on the write up :thumbsup:
    Just a note, there is a TSB on the line going from the dryer to the condenser, they tend to stress crack,so if you get a leak that's the first place i'd check.

    If you want to check to see if you have the TSB line, remove the grill, and look at the line, if it looks like the one in the 2nd pic down, you're good, it's the TSB line.
     
  3. Aug 31, 2013 at 11:07 PM
    #3
    tam

    tam Well-Known Member

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    Icon Ext. Travel C/O, TC UCA, Spidertrax 1.25" spacers, CF hood, Glass bedsides, Doug Thorley cat-back, Goodyear Wrangler Duratrac 265/75/16
    Nice write up man! Thanks in advance in case I might need this write up somewhere down the line. :D
     
  4. Sep 1, 2013 at 4:45 AM
    #4
    smuook

    smuook Daily Driver "Plus"

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    Great job on writeup!
     
  5. Sep 1, 2013 at 7:49 AM
    #5
    wolfgang123

    wolfgang123 Well-Known Member

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    This is Great! my a/c has been blowing hot air for as long as i can remember. I have tried re-charging the system but still isn't very cold and only last for about a week. I thought there might have been a leak somewhere but i had the dealership check for leaks and they told me there were none. With that in mind i would rather just replace the whole system like you did. Are there any other parts needed that were not mentioned in this guide? i am assuming your a/c was cold before this repair that is why i ask, because my a/c has never been cold.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2013
    GQ7227 likes this.
  6. Sep 1, 2013 at 8:08 AM
    #6
    Madjik_Man

    Madjik_Man The Rembrandt of Rattle Can

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    I hope to god I never have to do this, but I just want to say this is the gold standard of how walk throughs should be constructed.
     
    Offroad2 likes this.
  7. Sep 1, 2013 at 8:11 AM
    #7
    BamaToy1997

    BamaToy1997 Wheel Bearing Master

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    best wheel bearings around! www.marionbumper2bumper.com
    AWESOME job on a write up! VERY good job there. To answer one thing, and pose a safety issue I would add this:

    The reason you should close the valves on the gauges after vacuum is to eliminate the yellow hose and the pump out of the loop. Even with the valves closed off totally, the gauges themselves are ALWAYS reading the pressure in their corresponding hoses (Blue gauge is blue hose, red gauge is red hose) This is a good idea because if you DID happen to have a leak in the yellow hose, or the pump, you would be lead to THINK it could be a leak in your truck. With the valves turned off you know that if a leak DID show, if would be either in your gauges themselves, or the truck. FYI, if you have a leak and need to know if it is the gauges, you can vacuum back down, close off the valves again, then close the valves on the hoses at the fittings to the truck. If the pressure drops, you know you have a bad hose/gauge.

    The other is a safety concern. NEVER EVER Charge your AC system with the engine running and the AC turned on. That is a VERY dangerous idea. The safest way is to connect to the low side as you have, and let the natural vacuum in the system, and the pressure in the can itself charge the truck. To assist in speeding this up a little you can put the can into a pan of warm water. This will speed it up a bit. After the final can is charged wait 10 minutes before starting the truck.

    Why? Because the low side is the suction side of the compressor. The compressor is just like your engine in that it draws in air, and compresses it. If you draw in R134a through the low side, and the can upside down, you are drawing in the refrigerant in LIQUID form. If this gets to the compressor fast enough (Which I have seen happen before) then the compressor will hydrolock and either become damaged, or blow out.

    As a safety rule one should NEVER charge an AC system with the engine running and clutch engaged. Some people try it and succeed, yes, but the risk involved is too great. No need in getting yourself hurt, or causing damage to a brand new part.

    Love the detailed write up! The photos and everything are great!
     
    Swallin likes this.
  8. Sep 1, 2013 at 8:39 AM
    #8
    geodude

    geodude [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Good news for you, your repair is going to be a whole lot cheaper.

    I can tell you now with almost 100% confidence, that the problem is moisture in your system. You DO NOT need to replace all components, you merely need a total evacuation and vacuuming. What you'll need to do is:

    1)Have the system evacuated
    2)Remove and Replace your Reciever/Dryer (one of the cheapest and easiest components) *add 20cc Oil to new Receiver because that's about how much will be in the old one and you need to keep the total system oil capacity around 7.75fl oz.
    3)There could also be worn O-rings allowing the moisture in, so if your interested in a very thorough repair, I would pull apart all the connections just enough to replace with new O-rings.
    4)Either do it yourself buy a vacuum pump and charge it, or take it somewhere to pull the vacuum and charge ($130-$150) so it's probably worth it just to buy the vacuum and gauges and do it yourself.
     
  9. Sep 1, 2013 at 8:45 AM
    #9
    geodude

    geodude [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I was unsure about charging with the system running as well, but every resource, Factory Service Manual included, said to charge with the system engaged. You make an excellent point though.

    Also about the gauges, It seemed like the valves close off between the gauge itself and it's corresponding line. Are you sure that the valve only closes between the gauge and the feed line?

    Thank You
     
  10. Sep 1, 2013 at 9:06 AM
    #10
    BamaToy1997

    BamaToy1997 Wheel Bearing Master

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    best wheel bearings around! www.marionbumper2bumper.com
    100% certain. What the valves below the gauges close off is the connection between the corresponding color hose, and the center, yellow hose connection. Been using these gauges for years.
     
  11. Sep 1, 2013 at 10:02 AM
    #11
    geodude

    geodude [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Good to know, thank you!
     
  12. Sep 1, 2013 at 3:32 PM
    #12
    x2468

    x2468 Well-Known Member

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    How similar is the V6 A/C replacement? My compressor has slowly been going for a year ever since I took the truck thru deep water. It started to squeal not too long ago, so I'm going to have the belt taken off before it goes. I can get a used one for like 120, and a local shop quoted me at 90 to change that.

    Since my compressor hasn't seized yet, I don't need a dryer and all that, I don't think....
     
  13. Sep 1, 2013 at 3:45 PM
    #13
    wolfgang123

    wolfgang123 Well-Known Member

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    you think its that simple?

    I have never done ANYTHING with a/c so i will have to do more research, i have no idea how to use an a/c vacuum pump.

    So as far as tools i would need this:
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/AC-MANIFOLD...Parts_Accessories&hash=item20d714ab08&vxp=mtr

    and:
    http://www.harborfreight.com/two-stage-3-cfm-air-vacuum-pump-66466.html


    you think a harbor freight set of gauges would work? i know the ones i originally posted will be better quality but at half price its defiantly a temptation.

    ??
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2013
  14. Sep 1, 2013 at 7:47 PM
    #14
    geodude

    geodude [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Not sure about the V6 system sorry.

    Yes, because the compressor hasn't totally shat out yet you will not need to flush or replace any other components. It is good practice however to replace the Receiver/dryer every-time you open up your system. I'm sure your mechanic will suggest it, and I would take his suggestion, however first buy one online and give it to him to install; it will save you some money on parts. *Denso is OEM

    Also just a squealing in the compressor could be attributed to a shot clutch or bearing on the compressor. I'd check that out first, it would be a little cheaper.
     
  15. Sep 1, 2013 at 7:51 PM
    #15
    wolfgang123

    wolfgang123 Well-Known Member

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    geodude what kind of vacuum pump did you use? i am trying to figure out all the specs for these pumps and what ranges i should be looking for these specs to fall under and i am having a hard time understanding all the literature.
     
  16. Sep 1, 2013 at 7:58 PM
    #16
    geodude

    geodude [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Wolfgang,

    Just from the information you've provided, I do think changing the Receiver/Dryer, pulling a long vacuum and recharging will solve your issue.

    The receiver/dryer works in part to dry out moisture from the a/c system, some say to replace it every 3-4 years (never happens) because the drying agent inside of them becomes saturated over-time and it can no longer wick moisture.

    Yes a set of harbor freight A/C manifold gauges will be fine, that's where I got mine 5 years ago and it still works great. Same with the 2.5CFM Vacuum Pump they sell. Make sure to use their 25% off coupons.

    Watch that video I provided above on charging the system and do a little research on your own and you'll see it's not that hard of a job.
     
  17. Sep 1, 2013 at 8:04 PM
    #17
    wolfgang123

    wolfgang123 Well-Known Member

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    gotcha thanks, i have been watching a ton of "ericthecarguy" a/c videos on you tube haha.. hopefully i will be ready to tackle this project later on in the month. Thanks for all the work you put into this how to guide its going to help a lot of people on this form!
     
  18. Sep 1, 2013 at 9:11 PM
    #18
    x2468

    x2468 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I took the belt off and spun the compressor without the clutch bearing and it didnt spin well. Pretty crunchy. I was hoping I could get away with a 5 dollar bearing
     
  19. Sep 15, 2013 at 8:44 PM
    #19
    geodude

    geodude [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Here's a little additional information that may help someone trying to recharge the system after the job. This is a troubleshooting guide used to determine if the correct amount of refrigerant has been put back into the system.

    4a08725d-fc21-4655-914f-15d2d5863b6a_zps_a0eaa31dbbb7b86930920fcd9ad655a3c40743c7.jpg
     
  20. Sep 27, 2013 at 11:15 AM
    #20
    wolfgang123

    wolfgang123 Well-Known Member

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    Well first off thanks again geodude! you motivated me to start working on my a/c system.

    replaced my a/c dryer went to recharge the system and did a vacuum test to be sure there were no leaks. OF COURSE! there is a leak...i did not have time to start looking for it so i charged the system and had ice cold a/c for about a day :(

    eventually i would like to try to find the leak but not really sure how im going to go about that. i guess i will just use dye...below is a pic from my adventure, just wanted to say thanks!

    [​IMG]
     

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