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Camping Question..

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by eddyb22, Dec 15, 2011.

  1. Dec 15, 2011 at 9:33 AM
    #1
    eddyb22

    eddyb22 [OP] Well-Known Member

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    So I go party and camp about every weekend with my buddies.. We always sleep in our trucks or in the bed of them but it is now getting into the 20's and lower at night so im tired of freezing my balls off..

    Anyone have any good tips of sleeping in a access cab?

    Or any cool camping gear stuff that you recommend?

    Cool tents or camping etc for the tacoma?

    THANKS!
     
  2. Dec 15, 2011 at 9:42 AM
    #2
    friction

    friction Well-Known Member

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  3. Dec 15, 2011 at 9:43 AM
    #3
    scottri

    scottri Well-Known Member

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    If you are going to sleep in the bed you will need to insulate between you and the cold bed. Air circulates under the truck all night.
     
  4. Dec 15, 2011 at 9:48 AM
    #4
    Lost_Humanity

    Lost_Humanity Bad decisions make great stories.

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    Bumper Dent Mod
    Dammit. Beat me to it.

    I disagree on the cerveza, though. Vodka. Millions of Russians (and Poles and Czechs) can't be wrong!

    Definitely get a better sleeping bag. Whatever it routinely gets down to get a bag at least 10 degrees warmer. (I.e. -- if it usually gets to 30 degrees where you camp, get a 20 degree bag)

    A good sleeping pad will help a lot, too. If you get one with an R rating of 7 or higher, it will help keep your body heat from escaping out into the frame of your truck.

    A good cheap-ish trick too is to cover your bed with a tarp or tonneau cover, and close the bed at night. A little claustrophobic, perhaps, but you'll trap in body heat and warm the bed area. If you want to get creative, line the bottom of the tarp/tonneau with a space blanket. The material will reflect heat back down toward you.
     
  5. Dec 15, 2011 at 9:52 AM
    #5
    jflan

    jflan Well-Known Member

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    This is how I rig my Taco for camping :
    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/...012_HM_Steelheader_spotted_on.html#Post713119
    I also use a Black Cat tent heater inside the cap and a Mr Heater/Cooker type infra red heater under the tarp.
    I'll fire the big infra red at night and in the morning to take the edge off.
    Instant campfire :p
    Be sure to have proper ventilation with these or you will not wake up!

    I bought a bigger tarp with the intention of taking it down to the ground for better cold weather performance.
    The new size is 12 x 20, white, heavy duty. It takes minimum 18' to go over the cap and reach the ground. Then 12' will be enough to extend away from the rig.

    Gotta seal under the tailgate and come up with a door system.

    Also have a full length Therm-a-Rest inflatable sleeping pad and a -15 rated REI down sleeping bag.



    Can't imagine trying to sleep in the cab.
     
  6. Dec 15, 2011 at 9:59 AM
    #6
    07NavyTaco

    07NavyTaco Well-Known Member

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    JFLAN, you think there's a good way to do that from the cab of the truck? do like an "A" frame from the cab out pass the tailgate?

    i'm gonna have to look into that. makes for a very cheap tent in the summer. :)
     
  7. Dec 15, 2011 at 10:11 AM
    #7
    jflan

    jflan Well-Known Member

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    You could use my system and have more room than an a-frame. You would just come off the back of the cab.
    The adjustable Eureka poles make it happen along with a bunch of shock cords (bungees)

    The key is to make it tight so it sheds water and resists the wind.
     
  8. Dec 15, 2011 at 10:45 AM
    #8
    bjmoose

    bjmoose Bullwinkle J. Moose

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    It's simple really.
    Tent to kill the breeze.

    Good sleeping pad to insulate below.

    Warm sleeping bag.

    Sleep in your clothes. If it's cold, you'll be more comfortable in high-tech-fabric long johns, even in the day.

    Wear a stocking cap.
     
  9. Dec 15, 2011 at 10:47 AM
    #9
    D13

    D13 Well-Known Member

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    Good quality sleeping pad, sleeping bag and tent.



    and as far as sleeping in your clothes like bjmoose said... never heard that before, usually recommended NOT to sleep in your clothes so your body heat warms up the bag better. In my experience, clothes No; long johns yes.
     
  10. Dec 15, 2011 at 10:55 AM
    #10
    186000mps

    186000mps ..Slingin' up mud and we're scarying off bunnies..

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    Although I haven't tried it yet, I was at Home Depot last week and saw the pink foam insulation and thought, hey I could sleep on that in the back of my truck, It'd be soft and comfy. I also eyed the silver solar radiant barriers and thought that would be good under a tent or sleeping bag
     
  11. Dec 15, 2011 at 11:44 AM
    #11
    07NavyTaco

    07NavyTaco Well-Known Member

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    i was taught in survival training that you do NOT sleep in your cloths. we did wear the long johns and we were in temps and weather that our rubber mats were frozen to the ground the next morning. :cool:
     
  12. Dec 15, 2011 at 1:53 PM
    #12
    jflan

    jflan Well-Known Member

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    Don't know WTF the pink foam is, just make sure it's not the pink fiberglas. That could get itchy :p

    You probably mean what's called "rigid foam insulation"...
    That would work but it's overkill and bulky to stow. My Thermarest inflatable insulates me fine over the bed. Trapped air is the insulator for all this stuff.
     
  13. Dec 15, 2011 at 1:57 PM
    #13
    jflan

    jflan Well-Known Member

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    I would agree with that.
    If you have the right gear, you're in your skivvies and tee shirt.
    If you have to wear your clothes, your bag is not up to the task.
    Sometimes I throw the bag open in the middle of the night to cool off.

    I need a good rectangular bag....way tired of the confining mummy style.
     
  14. Dec 15, 2011 at 2:12 PM
    #14
    07NavyTaco

    07NavyTaco Well-Known Member

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    I need a good sleeping bag period.:eek:
     
  15. Dec 15, 2011 at 2:20 PM
    #15
    Enzo

    Enzo Well-Known Member

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    Buy a warm sleeping bag. The wife and I just bought North Face 15 and 20 degree bags and they are by far the best sleeping bags we have ever owned.
     
  16. Dec 15, 2011 at 2:21 PM
    #16
    Fodder4U

    Fodder4U Well-Known Member

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    I have 2 sleeping bags I use. One is for warmer weather and the other is rated for 30 degrees. When it is really cold (20 degrees or lower) I slip the warm weather bag into the cold one and am good to go even on a cot. Also it is best to change into a fresh dry shirt and sleep pants before getting into bed and fresh socks if you prefer to wear them.
     
  17. Dec 15, 2011 at 2:33 PM
    #17
    maineah

    maineah Well-Known Member

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    Pull a camper and turn on the heat.
     
  18. Dec 15, 2011 at 3:47 PM
    #18
    Lost_Humanity

    Lost_Humanity Bad decisions make great stories.

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    Bumper Dent Mod
    This.

    I can see the added benefit of wearing lightweight synthetics or wool to wick moisture and create baffles to trap air, but today's sleeping bags are designed so well to trap heat that you shouldn't need clothing.

    I usually wear a Dri-Fit or something similar just to keep the Man Funk from the inside of my bag, and I put my socks and possibly a water bottle down by my feet to keep them from freezing overnight.

    If you have to wear layers of clothing to bed, your bag isn't warm enough.
     
  19. Dec 15, 2011 at 4:55 PM
    #19
    TJ Asher

    TJ Asher Well-Known Member

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    Already been a lot of good advice on this thread.

    I've been winter camping for over 20 years now.


    A good sleeping bag cannot be beat and makes all the difference between just surviving and camping.

    Your body exudes vapor all the time and that can and does collect inside the sleeping bag insulation. A good bag will have a breathable outer layer to let that moisture pass through and prevent wind/air from coming through the bag and sucking the heat away. Really good bags will have a breathable/waterproof outer layer.

    A tent helps keep wind off you and from sucking the heat from your sleeping bag if your bag does not have a good outer layer.

    Down bags are warmer, lighter and pack smaller but are more expensive than synthetic bags. If you go down make sure it's a water-proof bag because any wetness will kill the insulating properties of down and it will be a very cold night.

    A good sleeping pad helps insulate under the bag where your body weight crushes down the insulation. A MUST with down bags.

    NEVER sleep in your clothes. Your clothes will become saturated with the vapor coming off your body and will be uncomfortable. NEVER sleep in cotton. Wicking thermal underwear or naked is best. Yes, I said naked. It's hard to believe but sleeping naked will be warmer than with clothes and be more comfortable. I did not believe it either when I first heard this suggested to me over a decade ago and well, it's true. :)

    If you are in extreme cold get an inner bag liner to keep the moisture from your body from leeching into the bag insulation from the inside. They are not the most comfortable but if your bag becomes saturated with moisture from your body it will not insulate properly.

    Don't cheap out on a sleeping bag. Buy the best you can afford.

    Lost Humanity suggested going with a rating 10 degrees less than your norm, that's a really good idea. I think bag ratings are a little optimistic. I have a -5 degree bag and at 5 below Fahrenheit it's not really all that comfortable although I have used it in much colder conditions. :)

    Bottom line, get a good back and stretch out in the bed and enjoy the stars. Much better than trying to sleep all cramped in the cab.
     
  20. Dec 15, 2011 at 5:06 PM
    #20
    TacoDawgfan

    TacoDawgfan Hunker Down You Hairy Dawg!

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    Yeah, the sleeping bag. I learned about them the hard way. :eek: I didn't know there was such a difference in them. After camping out while riding 4 wheelers with my friends in a tent on a 20-30 degree night. My 2 friends slept like babies while I couldn't sleep at all. The next day they informed me they had 20 degree sleeping bags. I didn't know there was such. I bought one and couldn't believe how warm it kept me once I got my body heat inside. The hard part is making yourself get out in the morning.
     
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