1. Welcome to Tacoma World!

    You are currently viewing as a guest! To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account.

    As a registered member, you’ll be able to:
    • Participate in all Tacoma discussion topics
    • Communicate privately with other Tacoma owners from around the world
    • Post your own photos in our Members Gallery
    • Access all special features of the site

Selecting a mild lift (TRD Baja TX Pro + Icon AAL)

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by crashnburn80, Aug 3, 2015.

  1. Aug 3, 2015 at 11:38 PM
    #1
    crashnburn80

    crashnburn80 [OP] Vehicle Design Engineer

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2015
    Member:
    #156893
    Messages:
    12,018
    Gender:
    Male
    Kirkland, WA
    Vehicle:
    2015 DCSB TRD OR MGM
    Go Hawks!
    My build goal is to increase off road capability while simultaneously enhancing on road performance. Traditionally these goals are fundamentally opposed to each other.

    Lifting a vehicle can have negative effects to the vehicle which are often not considered. Lifts cause increased front CV operating angles on IFS trucks causing accelerated wear. Lack of adjustability in the front UCAs (upper control arms) to adequately compensate the alignment for the lift, resulting in positive camber. Positive camber decreases road holding ability and the steerings self return to center, not to mention chews through tires with uneven wear. Increased rear driveshaft operating angles which can introduce driveline vibrations which will excessive wear or premature failure. Inadequate brake line length to account for the lift a full drop leading to brake line stretch off road. Shocks that top out causing banging when going over bumps. Higher center of gravity leading to reduced vehicle stability. And the list goes on. And that is not opening the can of worms with oversized tires. (This list isn't meant to scare someone away from lifting).

    All of the above issues have available technical solutions, some of which are expensive. But they can also be mediated by taking a moderate build approach where you are working closer to the engineered design of the vehicle, rather than trying to resolve issues you self inflicted by modifying it.

    Keeping with moderation, I also did not want to increase my tire size greater than 1" over stock (265/75R16 or 265/70/R17) because of the excessive tire weight which kills fuel economy and performance, which I was not willing to sacrifice on my daily driver. While my truck sees a few multi-day off-road camping trips a year, its primary duty is pavement family hauler. See this thread for info on light weight tire selection.

    End result: stock left, lifted right


    Valving
    When looking at suspension setups, something you should consider is whether you want Digressive or Progressive shocks. Progressive shocks increase resistance the more you compress them, meaning soft at first and the more you compress the firmer the shock becomes. This translates to a soft ride good for slow speed technical trails. Digressive shocks reduce resistance the more you compress them, meaning very firm at first and soften the more you compress on them. This translates to firmer sporty handling on the street and then soften when taking larger hits off road.

    As solid mid-budget popular options, OME makes Progressive shocks, while Bilstein makes Digressive, though many other brands are available as well. I've run both and while they are both quality products, they each behave very differently.

    Springs
    You should also consider spring rate for how firm you'd like the suspension to ride and if you need any extra weight handling ability. Stock TRD is 550lbs. Pro is 600lbs, Baja is 650lbs. Softer springs will make for improved soft comfort off road, while sacrificing on road performance with more body roll and nose dive. Each vehicle will have different needs depending on the modifications, a truck with an ARB front bumper and winch is going to need a much heavier spring to account for the additional weight for the same lift vs a truck with a stock front end.

    TRD Baja
    Looking for a mild lift, with a mild tire increase, while increasing street performance and extending travel, I found TRD Engineers had already been there and done that. Not with the Pro, but before that with the Baja. Meaning the negative points had been mitigated by the factory engineering team for Toyota to give the OEM Warranty stamp of approval. I like factory solutions when available due to the quality and attention to detail.

    The digressively valved Bilstein TRD Baja kit (part# PTR13-35120) features oversized front Bilstein 2.5" shocks providing 1.75" front lift with 1.5" extended travel, and large rear Bilstein 2.0" remote reservoir rear shocks providing an additional 1" of travel. The Baja front springs have a 650lb spring rate, compared to 550lb TRD stock, 600lb TRD Pro. The front spring perches are offset so the driver side is about 1/4" higher to counter the Taco lean from the factory.

    The great thing about properly engineered systems is in the details. The TRD Baja gains an additional 1.5" of extended travel using new lower profile TRD bump stops that are swapped out with the lift. The rear end hard brake lines are dropped for extended droop with a brake line bracket drop kit. The 1.75" lift negates the need for control arm changes and can still meet factory alignment specs. Features you don't often see in any aftermarket kit.

    Disclaimer: Yes there are other more 'cost effective' lifts. This is not the cheapest or best bang for the buck. I wanted something different, mild, and professionally tuned for the specific application from the factory.

    Rear leafs
    While the Baja levels the front end, I wanted to maintain my factory rake and improve the rear suspension as well. I do use my truck for light homeowner duty, and dislike the sagging rear end when loaded. IMO it would sag too much just sitting on the tailgate with the stock springs. While new leaf packs are a good way to go, it seemed like a waste on a truck that was brand new, so I looked at AALs. Single leaf AAL tend to ride immensely harsh. A 3-leaf progressive AAL rides softer and gets progressively firmer as it is compressed for optimum ride quality. I went with Icon 1.5" AAL, though Wheelers/Headstong/Toytec all offer the same product under different branding. I removed the overload spring reducing height from 2.0" to 1.5" (I don't do heavy hauling or towing) with the AAL install, as this is supposed to provide a better ride. According to Icon removing the overload reduces capacity by 10%, although in my experience driving the truck moderately loaded handled better with the Icon leafs and no overloads than stock with overloads. Removing the overload also allows you to reuse the factory u-bolts, though longer u-bolts are included with the Icons. Factory hardware is usually higher quality than aftermarket hardware, so it should be reused in favor of aftermarket whenever applicable. Reusing my existing U-bolts also saves the trouble of cutting down the new ones since they were extended length.

    Install
    I didn't take pics of the full kit pre-install. See the 'Because Baja' thread for additional reference.

    Rear shock comparison
    IMG_3539.jpg

    There have been debates on extended shock length in the past, so I took theses:
    IMG_3541.jpg

    Approx 1 3/8" longer than stock in the rear
    IMG_3543.jpg

    While trdparts4u.com says "you will also need to order 2 of the PTR13-35120-AE brackets for the rear remote reservoirs," this is incorrect. The mounting brackets are included in the Baja kit and do not need to be purchased seperately.

    Picture of the bracket mounted using the factory frame holes, with the nice bump out to account for the factory welds. Good attention to detail. Note that the reservoir must be placed in the bracket before mounting, otherwise there is not clearance between the reservoir and shock body to insert the reservoir later.
    FullSizeRender.jpg

    Fully mounted with AAL
    IMG_3540.jpg

    Booted shock bodies tend to trap moisture leading to corrosion. This can lead to debate for aftermarket shocks to run booted to protect the shock shaft or bootless to protect against corrosion. The TRD units had many venting holes around the attachment points of the boot to prevent moisture buildup. Again, good attention to detail.

    The AAL install was easy, remove the u-bolts, detach the brake line from the overload, remove the bump stop, remove the overload and insert the AAL with the longer side to the rear of the truck. I did not have to cut any spring retaining clamps, though you do have to cut the center pin to size down to size to reinstall the bump stop.

    The overload does contain the brake line mounting bracket, so with the removal of the overload, the mount location is lost. I did a flex test with the brake line unmounted and with the 1.5" increase in lift of the AAL, the previous mounting location would have pulled the brakes line too tight anyway. Mine currently is not mounted to the leaf.

    Upfront
    IMG_3590.jpg

    Note the second lower ring shown for adjustment to counter the Taco lean. This is a picture of the driver side, using the upper ring:
    IMG_3592.jpg

    Extended travel (short) front bump stops installed:
    IMG_3591.jpg

    Before:
    IMG_3487.jpg

    After:
    IMG_3621.jpg

    Measurements after are center hub to fender 23" rear, 22" front. This is a mild lift. The 'Because Baja' thread has more pics.

    One of the few complaints the Baja kit gets is surface corrosion issues. This sounds like it was solved on the Pro with additional zinc platting. I sprayed all new components with Fluid Film after reading reviews on TW to prevent any corrosion issues. I think Fluid Film is my new favorite spray can, I also used it on the rear leafs to prevent any squeaks during assembly. While I don't have corrosion issues, if I were to do it again I would spray the shock bodies in clear coat, paying special attention to not hit the shock shaft. Only because fluid film is a maintenance solution whereas clear coat would be a permanent solution.

    Driving impressions
    With my overdriven supercharger, this Baja suspension and selecting a light weight wheel/tire combo, you'd swear a German car company built this truck. The suspension is firm and controlled, the oversized digressive shocks handle like a sporty car on the street but soak up any large hits thrown their way while the 650lb springs keep the truck handling flat in the corners. Far more preferable to the soft stock TRD off road. I am glad I didn't go with the softer spring rate Pro kit. The rear end feels much more stable than stock as well. The Baja with the 3-leaf AAL feels like it was born for speed. From others I have talked to that drove both the consensus was the Pro had more nose dive when braking, more body roll, and overall and was a softer setup. The Baja has very little nose dive or body roll and handles very well. The Baja ride is stiffer at slow speeds off road, unless you are Baja racing and taking things at speed, in which case the Baja eats it right up.

    Similar solution
    While I went with an OEM setup, a similar setup is available for cheaper using Bilstein 6112 and 5165s which are the same shock assemblies, though not tuned by TRD, and usually paired with a softer spring and do not include extended travel bump stops, brake line drop brackets or account for the taco lean without an additional spacer.

    Part numbers
    Baja TX Pro kit (PTR13-35120)
    Icon Progressive AAL (5-1100)
    You do not need to purchase: TRD Remote reservoir bracket (PTR13-35120-AE). This is included in (PTR13-35120)

    Update
    Part numbers to purchase the brake line spacers and extended travel bump stops separately, for use with the 6112s, often cumulatively referred to as the Baja hardware kit. Credit to @JD'STaco for the part numbers and the picture below.

    90461-10616 Clamp (driver side extended brake line clamp)
    PTR13-35120-AD TRD Suspension hardware kit (main brake line spacer, and bump stop washers)
    48304-04090 Spring Bumper (front extended travel bump stops)

    NOTE: Bilstien 5160 rear remote resi shocks included a brake line spacer kit part #B4-XB1-Z096A02. It contains 1 spacer - 1 brake line clamp - 1 hex head cap screw and washer. (Missing front bump stop washers compared to the OEM hardware kit).

    Additional photo of the bump stop differences (Baja left, stock right):
    bumpstops.jpg

    Comparison pics
    Parked next to a stock AC TRD off-road, even in MGM. I snapped some pics for easy side by side comparison before and after Baja lift plus tires.








    Testing
    Off road out at the funny rocks (I wasn't the one who filmed vertically):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIHAhINLRfI

    Update 9/11/2018
    On my last outing I needed a bit more ground clearance, and now new skids... While I wanted to add more ground clearance, I still wanted the truck to be a balanced build without adding performance robbing heavier tires.

    I reinstalled the overloads, added 1/4" top plate spacer to the passenger side for ~1/2" more lift and despite Toyotas efforts to counter the Taco lean in the Baja kit, it is still there. So I added a 1/2" top plate spacer to the driver side to resolve the Taco lean once and for all.

    1/2"+ rear lift gain
    ~1/2" passenger side lift
    ~1" driver side lift - now level!!!

    Then I bumped the tire side from 265/70R17 C-load to 255/75/R17 C-load. Diameter increases from 31.5 to 32, or about the same as running 275s (32.2) while inflicting only a ~1lb weight gain over 265s compared to over 8lbs gain for 275s. And they will hopefully avoiding rubbing issues by running the slightly skinnier tire with my increased offset TRD wheels and low profile Rokblokz flaps. The 10mm width difference is only 5mm per side, meaning a virtually unnoticeable change of 3/16" in reduction in how far the tire sticks out.

    To keep alignment precisely dialed in, I added SPC light racing UCAs. These have the most adjustability of all the UCAs, retain a sealed ball joints with extended operating range, unlike maintenance heavy exposed uniballs that end up needing rebuilds. The SPC UCAs also have a unique maintenance free rubber-in-polly bushings that allow stock like rubber maintenance free quietness of operation with improved polly performance over stock. Most all other brands use polly bushings which should be greased with a graphite lubricant to keep them quiet and becomes an additional maintenance item. You can see my additional thoughts on them later in the thread here.

    Following the recommended install instructions, I did end up with a minor rub at the rear of the wheel well with my 255/75R17 when the wheels are turned and the suspension is compressed. Fortunately with their adjustability I can rotate the cammed joint forward to make the tires clear. I still need to do this before my next trail outing.
    SCP UCA product page here and FAQ page here.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    To remount the overloads with the AAL I did have to remove the rear overload U-brackets. Drill out the center pin, flip the overload over on the concrete so it is resting on the U-bracket and give it the overload BFH treatment till the bracket pops off.

    [​IMG]

    Net ground clearance gain is a little over 3/4" or more (due to leveling).

    Baja Pro + 1" larger tire over stock = 2.25" more ground clearance than stock.
    Current setup = 3"+ more ground clearance than stock.

    There is occasional minor rubbing on the front mud flap if the tire is turned at just the right angle when the suspension is compressed. I'm already running high clearance flaps. Will have to investigate options.

    Take Aways:
    The purpose of this thread is not to prescribe a TRD lift, it is to help people make informed choices. Any lift can avoid lifting complications by taking a balanced build approach, it doesn't have to be TRD or Bilstein, although TRD goes the extra mile in the details and is specifically tuned for the truck. In general, lifting should be done as low as necessary for best performance and least amount of issues. I'll admit as much as anyone I wan't my truck to be a little bit bigger looking than stock. But I also want to balance that with the trucks ability to perform and maintain stock reliability.

    If you found this helpful, you might be interested in my thread on selecting light weight oversized tires:
    https://www.tacomaworld.com/threads...eel-tire-combo-trd-rock-warriors-ko2s.381030/
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2018
  2. Aug 3, 2015 at 11:58 PM
    #2
    locster

    locster Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2014
    Member:
    #133656
    Messages:
    977
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Luke
    Orange County, CA
    Vehicle:
    2014 DCSB 4x4
    Nice write up.

    How come you didn't install the spacer brackets for the brake fluid lines? They give a little extra wiggle room in the flexible lines for the added rear travel. Correct me if I'm wrong, but the lines bolted to the leaf packs are just the E-brake cables.
     
  3. Aug 4, 2015 at 3:47 AM
    #3
    pittsnogled

    pittsnogled I like turtles

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2013
    Member:
    #114408
    Messages:
    351
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    kirk
    South Carolina
    Vehicle:
    2014TRDsport
    5100's all around with OME 884 at 0. Weathertechs, Carhartt seat covers. BFG KO2's 265/70/17. T4R SEMA wheels. 18% tint on front windows. General Springs HD 4 leaf pack, Leer 100 XR shell.
    looks good
     
  4. Aug 4, 2015 at 8:37 AM
    #4
    ThatguyJZ

    ThatguyJZ Instagram: thatguyjz

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2013
    Member:
    #103173
    Messages:
    754
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Jim
    TRIAD, NC
    Vehicle:
    2014 MGM DCSB 4x4 TRD Off Road
    A TRD OR built into a Baja/PRO hybrid
    Good post and truck looks awesome!

    Just a tip - spin the rear shocks and reservoirs around so both end of the braided line are facing outward. Make sure the line isn't rubbing anywhere on the shock body

    Like this

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Aug 4, 2015 at 8:47 AM
    #5
    crashnburn80

    crashnburn80 [OP] Vehicle Design Engineer

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2015
    Member:
    #156893
    Messages:
    12,018
    Gender:
    Male
    Kirkland, WA
    Vehicle:
    2015 DCSB TRD OR MGM
    Go Hawks!
    Thanks for pointing that out. I'll check it out this evening. I didn't pay much attention to that since I thought I had removed the mounting points on the overload when I swapped the AAL, as the kit does not include any instructions.

    Thanks for the pointer. I did check that there is no contact, enough space to place your fingers between the line and the shock body, but that makes sense. I will adjust this evening when I'm also checking the rear brake line spacer and installing my trailer harness relocation bracket.
     
    mschein1 likes this.
  6. Aug 4, 2015 at 9:06 AM
    #6
    Lomez

    Lomez Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2015
    Member:
    #159079
    Messages:
    224
    First Name:
    Lomez
    AZ
    Vehicle:
    2015 Silver Sky DCSB 4WD
    Subscribed.

    What you describe in your opening paragraph perfectly matches my needs. Since I don't know the equipment between models very well, is the set up you went with bolt-on-able to a BASE 4x4?
     
  7. Aug 4, 2015 at 10:01 AM
    #7
    ThatguyJZ

    ThatguyJZ Instagram: thatguyjz

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2013
    Member:
    #103173
    Messages:
    754
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Jim
    TRIAD, NC
    Vehicle:
    2014 MGM DCSB 4x4 TRD Off Road
    A TRD OR built into a Baja/PRO hybrid
    I drilled out the e-brake cable brackets and mounted it to the pack clamp on my AAL, in a similar location to where it was stock. I haven't done any crazy flexing but so far there has not been an issue.

    When you say you didn't have to cut any factory pack clamps to install the AAL, do you have a photo of the rear sections of the leafs with the AAL installed? In mine the longest AAL came in contact with the OEM leaf clamp and rivet, which is why in my case I had to grind it off. I'm curious if ICON redesigned the AAL to make it a non-issue.

    Also did your kit include the spacer for the rear brake line bracket located on/near the drivers side of the rear axle? I think that's what locster may be referring to.
     
    HFDane likes this.
  8. Aug 4, 2015 at 10:51 AM
    #8
    crashnburn80

    crashnburn80 [OP] Vehicle Design Engineer

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2015
    Member:
    #156893
    Messages:
    12,018
    Gender:
    Male
    Kirkland, WA
    Vehicle:
    2015 DCSB TRD OR MGM
    Go Hawks!
    Yes. If you have the 4.0 it could be a good fit. If you have the 2.7 I think it would be too stiff up front, in which case the other Bilstein option with lighter springs may be a better fit. The only applicable suspension difference (since you are removing the shocks and front springs) is if you have the 3 leaf rear or the 2 leaf rear. I have the 3 leaf.

    When I flex tested the truck on the jack, the rear cables were stretched really tight. I don't think there would be any to spare going to leaf spring mount point before going to the brake drum without extending the line.

    Mine stopped just short of the clamp, perfect fit. I saw your post about having to cut that clamp, which is why I commented on it here. I'll take a pic and post it tonight.

    Right, that was included and what I believe that is what locster was referring to as well, which I will look at this evening.
     
  9. Aug 4, 2015 at 11:08 AM
    #9
    ThatguyJZ

    ThatguyJZ Instagram: thatguyjz

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2013
    Member:
    #103173
    Messages:
    754
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Jim
    TRIAD, NC
    Vehicle:
    2014 MGM DCSB 4x4 TRD Off Road
    A TRD OR built into a Baja/PRO hybrid
    Good to know, thanks!


    Thanks! Can you also take a pic of the driver's side forward most AAL pack clamp. I'm interested to see where it is in relationship to the fuel tank mount on the frame of the truck. Occasionally my clamp will hit that mounting point.
     
  10. Aug 4, 2015 at 1:55 PM
    #10
    nd4spdbh

    nd4spdbh Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2013
    Member:
    #114055
    Messages:
    11,487
    Gender:
    Male
    SoCal
    Vehicle:
    13 DCSB TRD OR v6 Auto
    Looks good, any chance you can get a pic of the different front bumpstops side by side?
     
  11. Aug 4, 2015 at 6:43 PM
    #11
    Black Taco

    Black Taco Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2010
    Member:
    #29356
    Messages:
    1,955
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Rob
    WPB, FL
    Vehicle:
    TOYOTA
    No mods whatsoever!
    Nice write up! I'm mid-way through my TX suspension install. I still have to get the fronts assembled. I've been too damn busy. I may just have the dealer do it and then install them myself.
     
  12. Aug 4, 2015 at 9:04 PM
    #12
    crashnburn80

    crashnburn80 [OP] Vehicle Design Engineer

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2015
    Member:
    #156893
    Messages:
    12,018
    Gender:
    Male
    Kirkland, WA
    Vehicle:
    2015 DCSB TRD OR MGM
    Go Hawks!
    Thank you! Brake line spacer installed:
    IMG_3626.jpg

    No grinding required, Icon AALs line up perfect (AAL have the tapered edge). Shocks also rotated:
    IMG_3638.jpg

    The clamp and the tank strap are pretty far offset front to rear:
    IMG_3632.jpg

    Left to right the plastic tank 'skid' and the leaf spring clamp retaining bolt don't have a lot of clearance. Just enough to slide your hand in-between. WTF on the plastic tank skid. My last Tacoma had a steel one.
    IMG_3629 (1).jpg

    I tried taking pics side by side with the mounted stops, but it was really difficult to see. The new Baja stops are identical below the flange and flat on top of the flange, vs the OEM stops that have almost 3/4" rise on top of the flange. So it appears the Baja stops give almost 3/4" greater travel in compression, which means that with 1.5" greater travel it is also 3/4" greater droop.

    IMG_3637 (1).jpg
     
    syswalla and EDDO like this.
  13. Aug 5, 2015 at 12:39 AM
    #13
    locster

    locster Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2014
    Member:
    #133656
    Messages:
    977
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Luke
    Orange County, CA
    Vehicle:
    2014 DCSB 4x4
    That top Icon leaf looks very close to the clamp. When the whole pack flexes or go into a negative arch, wouldn't it hit and cause a bind? Maybe it's just the angle of the picture, could be a non issue.

    Regarding the clamp bolt getting close to the gas tank, looks like you can flip the bolt the other way and gain about 1/4" of clearance :)

    Again, nice writeup with lots of good pictures. If you can list all the part numbers, I think it will benefit future members greatly. Thanks for sharing.
     
  14. Aug 5, 2015 at 7:39 AM
    #14
    Hans Moleman

    Hans Moleman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2008
    Member:
    #4505
    Messages:
    959
    Gender:
    Male
    Bay Area, CA
    Vehicle:
    2006
    My Icon AAL had screw holes on the bracket for the emergency brake cable.
     
  15. Aug 5, 2015 at 8:01 AM
    #15
    nd4spdbh

    nd4spdbh Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2013
    Member:
    #114055
    Messages:
    11,487
    Gender:
    Male
    SoCal
    Vehicle:
    13 DCSB TRD OR v6 Auto
    Interesting. Thanks for the pic sir!

    I have never really looked at the stock bumpstops but i see what you are talking about in the original pictures at your top post vs the one you posted of the stock bumpstop. I do see that the baja setup has a big washer above the bumpstop to space it down a smidge.
     
  16. Aug 5, 2015 at 10:18 AM
    #16
    crashnburn80

    crashnburn80 [OP] Vehicle Design Engineer

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2015
    Member:
    #156893
    Messages:
    12,018
    Gender:
    Male
    Kirkland, WA
    Vehicle:
    2015 DCSB TRD OR MGM
    Go Hawks!
    The instructions implied if it mounted without contact no cutting was required. There is a little more space than that angle in the picture shows, but I'll check for contact marks after testing it this weekend.

    I initially tried that, but there isn't clearance for the bolt to go through without dropping the OEM leaf because the tank is in the way. And you cannot pre-insert the bolt because it has to be off to install the AAL in order to clear the OEM leafs. I think there should be adequate clearance, I'll check for contact marks after this weeknd and if there are any I'll drop the OEM leaf and flip the bolt.

    Edited the original post to include part numbers at the bottom. :)
     
  17. Aug 5, 2015 at 2:27 PM
    #17
    monkeyface

    monkeyface Douchebag, or just douche if we're friends

    Joined:
    May 13, 2012
    Member:
    #78740
    Messages:
    3,133
    Gender:
    Male
    Colorado
    Vehicle:
    '90,'97,'12,'05 Tundra 4.7,'07 T4R 4.7,'08 T4R 4.7
    Nicely done.
     
  18. Aug 5, 2015 at 5:11 PM
    #18
    ThatguyJZ

    ThatguyJZ Instagram: thatguyjz

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2013
    Member:
    #103173
    Messages:
    754
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Jim
    TRIAD, NC
    Vehicle:
    2014 MGM DCSB 4x4 TRD Off Road
    A TRD OR built into a Baja/PRO hybrid
    Thanks for the pics! Those look totally different than mine as far as clearance and location of the clamp in relationship to the gas tank and with the stock leaf pack.
     
  19. Aug 7, 2015 at 11:14 AM
    #19
    ThatguyJZ

    ThatguyJZ Instagram: thatguyjz

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2013
    Member:
    #103173
    Messages:
    754
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Jim
    TRIAD, NC
    Vehicle:
    2014 MGM DCSB 4x4 TRD Off Road
    A TRD OR built into a Baja/PRO hybrid

    You may find that raising/lowering the axle on that side could give you the room you need to flip the bolt without removing anything. I managed to flip mine and my clamp is further forward. But if you don't have any issues there's really no need at this time. :)

    Also, did you get this bracket/clamp with your kit to replace the one under the driver's leaf spring? The one with the kit is a little longer.

    https://www.tacomaworld.com/threads/because-baja.277344/page-22#post-8076470
     
  20. Aug 8, 2015 at 8:07 PM
    #20
    TACOVRD

    TACOVRD I Identify As A Prius

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2015
    Member:
    #159264
    Messages:
    6,436
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    TW Addict
    AZ/WA
    Vehicle:
    2019 T4R ORP - Formerly 2013 DCSB OR Spruce Mica
    Workin' on it....
    Tag to follow
     

Products Discussed in

To Top