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The minimum octane rating gasoline that should be used in my vehicle

Discussion in 'Technical Chat' started by genxer36, Apr 9, 2009.

  1. Apr 9, 2009 at 12:20 AM
    #1
    genxer36

    genxer36 [OP] Lord of Tomfoolery

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    Taken from the Toyota website

    You can find the recommended fuel octane rating for your vehicle on the back cover of your Owner's Manual.

    Our "current model" year vehicles have the following unleaded fuel octane rating recommendations:

    MODEL OCTANE

    4Runner
    - 87

    Avalon - 87*

    Camry
    4 Cylinder/Hybrid - 87
    V6 - 87

    Corolla - 87

    FJ Cruiser - 91

    Highlander
    V6/Hybrid - 87

    Land Cruiser - 87

    Matrix - 87

    Prius - 87

    RAV4
    4 Cylinder - 87
    V6 - 87

    Sequoia - 87

    Sienna - 87

    Solara
    4 Cylinder - 87
    V6 - 87*

    Tacoma
    4 Cylinder - 87
    V6 - 87

    Tundra - 87

    Yaris - 87

    * For improved vehicle performance, the use of premium unleaded gasoline with an octane rating of 91 or higher is recommended.
     
  2. Apr 9, 2009 at 3:11 AM
    #2
    Janster

    Janster Old & Forgetful

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    Why would an FJ Cruiser require 91? It has the same 4.0L as the tacoma.
     
  3. Apr 9, 2009 at 4:11 AM
    #3
    FoxySandChick

    FoxySandChick Well-Known Member

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    Here is that same question with some answers..
    http://www.thecarconnection.com/answers/x100994025_fj-cruiser-takes-premium-gaswtf
    and these guys are pretty split between the octanes...
    http://www.fjcruiserforums.com/forums/toyota-fj-cruiser-polls/3355-what-grade-gas-do-you-run.html

    from Toyota.com
    FJ- 4.0-liter DOHC 24-valve SFI VVT-i V6; 239 hp @ 5200 rpm; 278 lb.-ft. @ 3700 rpm
    Tacoma-4.0-liter DOHC EFI V6 with VVT-i; 236 hp @ 5200 rpm; 266 lb.-ft. @ 4000 rpm

    I don't know what any of that means, so what is the difference??
     
  4. Apr 9, 2009 at 11:33 AM
    #4
    RCBS

    RCBS "Cause I'm mighty proud of that ragged old flag."

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    EFI vs SFI electronice fuel injection vs sequential fuel injection. seems odd to me though, why use different fuel delivery for same motor. does seem to add a few hp and a couple pounds of tourque in the FJ's case.
     
  5. Apr 9, 2009 at 12:28 PM
    #5
    chris4x4

    chris4x4 With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine. Staff Member

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    The Tacoma 1GR-FE does have the same engine and fuel delivery system as the FJ. In many owners manuals (mine for example) it says to use 91 or higher for best performance. Why its listed as "EFI" and "SFI" on the Fj is beyond me.
     
  6. May 16, 2009 at 7:19 PM
    #6
    jpg366

    jpg366 Well-Known Member

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    Most engine computers will detune the engine to prevent knock. So there is a chance that you might see better performance or better mileage with higher octane gas. The question is, is the mileage gain more than the price difference? For my 6-cyls, I got 10% more mileage, so I bought mid-grade gas if it was not 10% over Regular in price.
     
  7. Jun 14, 2009 at 1:22 AM
    #7
    xDEADBIRDx

    xDEADBIRDx Active Member

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    i been using 89 in mine for 5 years now. what happens if i switch to 87 cuz gas is getting rediculous
     
  8. Jun 14, 2009 at 6:50 AM
    #8
    chris4x4

    chris4x4 With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine. Staff Member

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    You will be fine.
     
  9. Jun 30, 2009 at 7:22 PM
    #9
    flatlander

    flatlander Well-Known Member

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    I have to plead a whole lot of ignorance here.

    What about any octane with ethanol? Do 1gr's like or care about ethanol?

    TIA
     
  10. Jun 30, 2009 at 7:46 PM
    #10
    jandrews

    jandrews Carolina Alliance Southwest Region Ambassador

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    Owner's manual for the 09s says it's not a problem. As a general rule, less ethanol preferred.
     
  11. Jun 30, 2009 at 7:53 PM
    #11
    flatlander

    flatlander Well-Known Member

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    I was filling up at a place today that claimed to have 100% gasoline no ethanol. It mentioned all kinds of bad things, like it would cause water to be more of an issue with ethanol fuels, paint damage, etc... . I try to avoid anything more than E10.

    Thanks
     
  12. Jun 30, 2009 at 7:56 PM
    #12
    jandrews

    jandrews Carolina Alliance Southwest Region Ambassador

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    To clarify: Owner's manual says nothing E10 and less is a problem. I was assuming we weren't talking about substandard gas.
     
  13. Jun 30, 2009 at 7:58 PM
    #13
    BreezyTaco

    BreezyTaco Well-Known Member

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  14. Dec 28, 2009 at 7:00 AM
    #14
    ljlogan

    ljlogan Well-Known Member

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    ok about the fuel, what about the additives, like the BG products?
     
  15. Dec 28, 2009 at 10:20 AM
    #15
    Evil Monkey

    Evil Monkey There's an evil monkey in my truck

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    If you see a mileage boost with higher octane then a little math will suggest when to buy it. You need the price difference between regular and premium and the mpg difference between regular and premium. The better your mpg difference, the cheaper gas can be before it offsets. x= the price of regular. Here's the equation as ratios:

    x/RegMPG = (x+priceDiff)/PremMPG

    cross multiply yields:

    PremMPGx = RegMPGx + RegMPG(priceDiff)

    Now just plug in the numbers and do the math.

    Here's three examples:

    Let's assume premium gets you 1mpg more than regular and that your mpg is 17 with regular and 18 with premium.

    Assume premium is $0.20 more per gallon, the equation is
    18x = 17x + 17(0.20) ->multiply 17 * 0.20

    18x = 17x + 3.40 -> subtract 17x from both sides

    x = 3.40

    So when regular gas hits $3.40 or more, it's cheaper to buy premium.

    ______________________________________________________________
    Depending on your current gas mileage, that price will change so substitute your current mileage and what you would gain in mpg.

    So if you averaged 20mpg on regular and 21 on premium, the price would be:

    21x = 20x + 20(0.20) - > multiply 20 * 0.20
    21x = 20x + 5 -> subtract 20x from both sides
    x = 5
    $5 /gallon as break even.

    _______________________________________________________________
    If you got a 2 mpg boost at 20 mpg regular:

    22x = 20x + 20(0.20) -> multiply 20 * 0.20
    22x = 20x + 5 -> subtract 20x from both sides
    2x = 5 -> divide both sides by 2
    x = $2.50

    For a 2mpg boost at 20mpg regular, it's cheaper to buy premium when the price of regular is $2.50 or greater.
     
  16. Dec 28, 2009 at 10:34 AM
    #16
    hillbillynwv

    hillbillynwv Well-Known Member

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    The gas here in WV is up to 10% Ethanol. Could this be the reason why I'm only getting 14.5 MPG with 89 octane gas? I've talked to other local people who drive the exact same truck and they are using 87 octane and getting 17-19 MPG.
     
  17. Mar 12, 2010 at 11:10 AM
    #17
    Brutus

    Brutus Well-Known Member

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    MPG is also highly dependent on how you drive your Tacoma.
    If you drive it like a little old lady = better MPG
    Drive it like you stole it = better steal some gas cause ur MPG is going down!
     
  18. Mar 12, 2010 at 9:57 PM
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    dog tired

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  19. Jan 3, 2011 at 10:20 PM
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    GiverDeaner

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    I know an Auto engineer(For Hyundai)He performed a test of fuel grades to fuel economy and found over a period of 2 years he saved money using mid-grade(89).This only works on modern vehicles of course.But if you live in abnormally cold climates the higher the octane number the more difficulty the vehicle will have starting.(higher number=lower the voletility).
     
  20. Jan 5, 2011 at 7:41 AM
    #20
    DanT

    DanT Old Member

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    From the Minnesota Dept. of Commerce:

    "• If your engine runs well and does not knock or ping on low octane gasoline, there is no advantage in
    switching to higher octane gasoline.
    • If your engine knocks or pings, it does not necessarily mean something is wrong with the gasoline. It could
    be a problem with the engine’s electronic control systems, ignition timing or exhaust gas recirculation. On a
    high mileage engine, a carbon build-up in the cylinders can increase cylinder pressures and cause knock.• Almost all of today’s new cars have fuel-injected engines that need to use gasoline with a detergent additive.
    They do not necessarily need high octane gasoline with a detergent additive. Generally, new automobiles
    need high octane gasoline only if the manufacturer recommends it.
    • Always follow the auto manufacturer’s octane recommendations in your owner’s manual.
    Octane Myths
    • High octane gasoline improves mileage.
    In general, if your car is designed to run on 87 octane gasoline, high octane gasoline will not improve
    mileage. If switching to high octane gasoline does improve mileage, you might find that your engine, or its
    control systems, need repair.
    • High octane gasoline gives quicker starting.
    No, it doesn’t.
    • High octane gasoline increases power.
    If your car is designed to run on 87 octane gasoline, you shouldn’t notice any more power on high octane
    gasoline. Again, if it does make a noticeable difference, your engine, or the engine’s electronic control
    systems, may need repair.
    • High octane gasoline has been refined more – it is just a better product.
    Additional refining steps are used to increase the octane; however, these additional steps do not necessarily
    make the gasoline a “better” product for all engines. They just yield a different blend of hydrocarbons that
    burn more slowly. The additional steps also increase the price."

    Disclaimer: this was written May, 2004. I don't imagine things have changed much, but... don't really know

    FWIW I've owned and operated dozens of different vehicles since the 60's; have always followed manufacturer's recommendations for octane ratings and never experienced issues I could remotely relate to not using gasoline with a higher octane rating than recommended.

    I have sometimes, in a pinch had to use lower octane gas and with one exception have had no problems as long as I don't try to accelerate to quickly.

    The exception was a 1968 Fiat 850 Spyder. THAT tiny little engine needed the highest octane gas it could get.
     
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